Jun 302015
 

A cross-post from The Regency Redingote:

Well, not in the same bed, but she did spend some years in his bedroom. She probably didn’t mind, since she had also spent a number of years in the royal bath of a French king three hundred years previously. But neither of her highly-placed gentlemen friends were able to save her from many years of obscurity, including right through the decade of the Regency. And yet, it was her association with Bonaparte which triggered an event a hundred years after she left his bedroom which catapulted her to the great fame she enjoys today.

A few pieces of the puzzle which is the enigma of the Mona Lisa

Continue reading »

Jun 232015
 

Silhouettes of a man and woman in Regency dress against a background of the number 80

In today’s article, award-winning Regency romance author, Ann Lethbridge, shares her experiences and views of Georgette Heyer’s Regency Bath Tangle. In particular, Ann has a special, even sympathetic, take on the very alpha male hero of this story. If you have read the book, do you agree with Ann, or do you have a different take on this alpha male hero and how Heyer handled him?

Everyone is welcome to share their own views on this story or Regency romance in general in comments to this post.

Continue reading »

Jun 202015
 

A cross-post from The Regency Redingote:

This past week, the fellow who reports on sport for the local public radio station did a tongue-in-cheek piece on the recent cheese rolling event which took place in Gloucestershire, England. His intent was to remind his listeners there were sporting activities abroad in the world beyond the upcoming basketball playoffs. However, his report also reminded me that this was an ancient country sport which had been enjoyed in England for several centuries, including during the years of the Regency.

A slice of cheese rolling lore …

Continue reading »

Jun 162015
 

A cross-post from The Regency Redingote:

Or to give this new history its full title, Prinny’s Taylor:   The Life and Times of Louis Bazalgette (1750 – 1830). As is probably obvious from the fact that the subject of this book and the author share a rather unique last name, Charles Bazalgette has researched and written a history of his ancestor, Jean Louis Bazalgette. Born in southern France, into a family of tailors, Louis emigrated to Great Britain about 1770. He began his career in London as a tailor, but by the end of his life, he had become a man of affluence who was able to enjoy a comfortable retirement and give all his children a good start in life.

The remarkable career of Louis Bazalgette . . .

Continue reading »

Jun 122015
 

Silhouettes of a man and woman in Regency dress against a background of the number 80

Regency romance author, Ella Quinn, today gives us a glimpse of The Toll-Gate, one of Georgette Heyer’s more unique Regencies, in which the story centers on the hero. It is particularly appropriate that The Toll-Gate is discussed this month, as the bicentennial anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo is only days away. The hero of this story has returned to England after serving as an aide-de-camp at Waterloo. He is finding civilian life a bit dull and sets out on what becomes quite the adventure, leading him to romance as well.

What are your views on this story and its characters? Please feel free to share them in comments to this article.

Continue reading »

Jun 092015
 

A cross-post from The Regency Redingote:

If you have not yet taken the time to explore this web site, I highly recommend it. MAPCO : Map and Plan Collection Online is a treasure trove of historical maps of London and the British Isles. There are other maps available at the site, including some of various locales in Australia. Needless to say, my primary interest in the site is for the Regency-era maps of London and England which are presented in the MAPCO archives.

Continue reading »

Jun 052015
 

Silhouettes of a man and woman in Regency dress against a background of the number 80

Romance author Lillian Marek discusses Georgette Heyer’s The Convenient Marriage in today’s article. This Georgian romance was published in 1934, just one year before Regency Buck, the very first Regency novel. The Convenient Marriage is Heyer’s first romance which involves a marriage of convenience, though it would not be her last. Like Lillian, do you enjoy romances which revolve around a marriage of convenience?

Please feel free to share your opinions in comments to this article.

Continue reading »

Jun 022015
 

Our members’ new releases (along with other new Regency Romance fiction releases) and other Regency related articles are available for download at The Regency Reader – June 2015. If you wish to receive The Regency Reader via email, we ask that you subscribe through MailChimp using this short subscription form.

New Releases for June 2015

Continue reading »

Cover image for The Incomparables anthology featuring Cerise DeLand, Sabrina York, Suzi Love, Lynne Connolly, Suzanna Medeiros and Dominique Eastwick

Cerise DeLand, Sabrina York, Suzi Love, Lynne Connolly, Suzanna Medeiros and Dominique Eastwick

The Incomparables: 6 Heroes of Waterloo and the 6 Ladies They Adore by 6 Incomparable Regency Authors
The Incomparables
Print, eBook
Historical/Some Sexual Contact

From the Duchess of Richmond’s ball in Brussels to the Battle of Waterloo and beyond, join these six unforgettable heroes as they journey back from the physical and emotional trials of war and discover the passion that thrills the body can also heal the heart.

Coming June 18th from bestselling and award winning historical romance authors Cerise DeLand, Sabrina York, Suzi Love, Lynne Connolly, Suzanna Medeiros and Dominique Eastwick.

This limited edition box set includes 6 scorching romances that commemorate the 200th anniversary of the June 18, 1815 Battle of Waterloo.

June 18, 2015
http://cerisedeland.com

May 302015
 

Silhouettes of a man and woman in Regency dress against a background of the number 80

The Heyer Regency in the spotlight today is Cotillion. Though Regency romance author, Elizabeth Johns, cut her teeth on the works of Jane Austen, when she had run though those, she moved on to the novels of Georgette Heyer, thus allowing her to continue to enjoy our favorite era, the Regency. Today, Elizabeth shares with us her views on Cotillion, one of the most light-hearted and amusing of all of Heyer’s Regencies.

As always, everyone is welcome to share their memories or favorite scenes from this, or any other Regency romance in comments to this article.

Continue reading »

May 232015
 

Silhouettes of a man and woman in Regency dress against a background of the number 80

The bad boy hero is a most popular romance trope today. Yet, it may surprise many people to know that it has been in use for at least 250 years. But perhaps no one did bad boys better than Georgette Heyer. Today, romance author, Bliss Bennet, shares her views on one of the badest of them all, the Marquis of Vidal, son of Satanas himself, the Duke of Avon, from These Old Shades. Vidal is the hero of the sequel, Heyer’s Georgian romance, Devil’s Cub.

Visitors are invited to share their views on bad boys or any other topic related to romance in comments to this article.

Continue reading »

May 192015
 

A cross-post from The Regency Redingote:

In the West Riding of Yorkshire, about four and a half miles east of the city of Leeds, stands a Jacobean-era country house which has an important link to the Regency. The house, called Temple Newsam, stands on a large estate which has a history stretching back to Roman times. A Roman road connecting Castelford with Adel ran across the property, and the mound which remains of this ancient "street" can still be seen on the north side of the estate. In the early middle ages it was on this property that the Knights Templar built a preceptory, or complex of buildings, which housed a provincial community of their order. It was this preceptory which gave Temple Newsam its name. Here the members of the community worked the land to sustain themselves and to contribute to the support of the Templars. The preceptory is now gone, as is the original manor house, built by Thomas, Baron Darcy, a nobleman beheaded by Henry VIII in 1538, when he rebelled against the dissolution of the monasteries. The property was seized by the Crown after Darcy’s death, and Henry gave it to his niece, Margaret, Countess of Lennox. Thus it became the property of the Earls of Lennox. In that same manor house was born Lord Darnley, who became the ill-fated husband of Mary Queen of Scots, and father of James I of England.

After the death of Lord Darnley, who was the eldest son of the Earl of Lennox, the property passed to his only son, King James I. In the first year of his reign in England, James granted the property to Ludovic Stewart, the second Duke of Lennox. In 1622, the Duke sold the property to Sir Arthur Ingram. In about 1630, with the exception of the part of the house which contained the room in which Lord Darnley had been born, the old manor house was mostly pulled down and rebuilt in red brick. That is the core of the Temple Newsam House which stands today. In 1661, Sir Arthur’s grandson, Henry Ingram, was created Viscount Irwin, (sometimes listed as Irvine), in the Scottish peerage, for his loyalty to King Charles I. There were nine Viscounts Irwin, the last, Charles, died in 1778, leaving five daughters, but no sons.

So, what is the Regency connection to this historic property?

Continue reading »

May 152015
 

Silhouettes of a man and woman in Regency dress against a background of the number 80

Georgette Heyer has often been compared to Jane Austen in general terms. Today, Regina Jeffers, author of a number of award-winning Regency romances, Austen tales and cozy mysteries, finds some one-to-one comparisons with several Austen characters in Heyer’s novel, The Quiet Gentleman. Based on your readings of Austen and Heyer, do you see those same comparisons?

Anyone with an opinion on this novel, or Regencies in general, is welcome to post them in comments to this article.

Continue reading »

May 122015
 

So many articles this month! I hope you find some of them to be of interest.

Gillray-very slippy weatherThe prodigiously talented Gillray: http://18thcand19thc.blogspot.co.uk/2015/03/james-gillray-prince-of-caricaturists.html

The care and upbringing of foundlings: http://www.thehistoryoflondon.co.uk/thomas-coram-and-the-foundling-hospital/

A London walk: https://londonhistorians.wordpress.com/2015/03/30/footsteps-of-soane-ii/

Continue reading »

May 082015
 

A cross-post from The Regency Redingote:

Today, paper hats are most often worn for a bit of fun at parties, or are made for a child by parent or grandparent for some make-believe playtime. But during the Regency, paper hats were regularly worn by working men in a number of trades. In fact, the wearing of such hats had only begun a few years before the Prince of Wales became Regent. It was during that second decade of the nineteenth century that the use of these hats became much more widespread among an expanding number of craftsmen and tradesmen. But these hats were not worn for fun, they had a much more serious purpose. It should be noted that the wearing of these hats seem to have been confined to English working men.

When paper hats were for work, not play …

Continue reading »

May 042015
 

Silhouettes of a man and woman in Regency dress against a background of the number 80

The Grand Sophy is one of Georgette Heyer’s best-loved Regency novels. Today, romance author, April Kihlstrom, explains that even though this novel is set in the English Regency, it was also a product of the time in which it was written and had a powerful impact on its readers. Those of you who read this novel within the first decade of its publication in the last century will almost certainly identify with why April so enjoyed this novel as a young woman. And those of you who did not live through those times and have only read it recently will get a dual history lesson, and, perhaps a greater appreciation of the power of Heyer’s fiction.

As always, everyone is invited to share their views and opinions about this novel in comments to this article.

Continue reading »

May 022015
 

Our members’ new releases (along with other new Regency Romance fiction releases) and other Regency related articles are available for download at The Regency Reader – May 2015. If you wish to receive The Regency Reader via email, we ask that you subscribe through MailChimp using this short subscription form.

New Releases for May 2015

Continue reading »

Cover image for Joanna Shupe's The Lady Hellion

Joanna Shupe

The Lady Hellion (Wicked Deceptions)
Kensington
Print, eBook
Historical/Graphic Sexual Contact

Lady Sophia Barnes doesn’t take no for an answer. Especially when she’s roaming London’s seedy underground…dressed as a man.

A rabble rouser for justice, Sophie’s latest mission is to fight for the rights of the poor, the wretched—and the employees at Madame Hartley’s brothel. She’s not concerned about the criminals who will cross her path, for Sophie has mastered the art of deception—including the art of wearing trousers. Now her fate is in her own hands, along with a loaded gun. All she needs is instruction on how to shoot it. But only one person can help her: Lord Quint, the man who broke her heart years ago. The man she won’t let destroy her again…

The last thing Damien Beecham, Viscount Quint, needs is an intrusion on his privacy, especially from the beautiful, exasperating woman he’s never stopped wanting. A woman with a perilously absurd request, no less! For Damien is fighting a battle of his own, one he wishes to keep hidden—along with his feelings for Lady Sophia. Yet that fight is as hopeless as stopping her outlandish plan. Soon all Quint knows for certain is that he will die trying to protect her…

May 26, 2015
http://joannashupe.com

Apr 282015
 

Caricatures were extremely popular during the Regency era. Thousands were produced, ranging from mild criticism to biting satire, and included political, social, and personal commentary. They were printed from etchings or engravings and sold to whoever would pay for them.

Continue reading »

Apr 252015
 

Silhouettes of a man and woman in Regency dress against a background of the number 80

An aging master con man, his cross-dressing offspring and their respective loves make for a wild romp through Georgian London in The Masqueraders. Today, Emma Kaye, romance author, shares why this romance by Georgette Heyer is so special to her and why she finds it such a timeless story. As Emma notes, perhaps a cross-dressing heroine is more believable in a historical romance. Or, is it simply that we take such things so for granted today that no one would think twice about it in a contemporary romance?

Feel free to share your views on this Georgian romance in comments to this post.

Continue reading »